Which Thrips are in Your Flower Crops (Part II): How to ID and Control Onion Thrips

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Thrips tabaci, or Onion thrips. Photo courtesy of Thrips-ID.com.

If you were at the Canadian Greenhouse Conference (or are regularly reading this blog!) you’d know we’ve recently identified Onion thrips as a pest of floriculture crops in Ontario (see this post).

Outside of Ontario?  Well, this still may apply to you, as a recent study in France also indicated that up to 47% of pest thrips in floriculture greenhouses were Onion thrips.  So, this issue could be wide-spread.

My last post covered the extent of the problem in Ontario’s industry.  This post will help you identify if YOU are dealing with Onion thrips (OT) along with Western flower thrips (WFT), and what to do about it.

 

Continue reading “Which Thrips are in Your Flower Crops (Part II): How to ID and Control Onion Thrips”

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Webinar Detailing Thrips Control Strategies Now on the Web.

thrips infographic_no titleFor those of you that missed my webinar on “Thrips Control: from Propagation to Pocketbook”, it is now available for free on the Greenhouse Canada Magazine website

Keep reading for more details and a link to the talk. Continue reading “Webinar Detailing Thrips Control Strategies Now on the Web.”

Leafminer control in Ontario’s greenhouse crops -what’s working?

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Fig. 1. Leaf mines on gerbera leaves.

As much as we all hate thrips, there are, frankly, worse problems to have.  And it’s name is Leafminer.  These flies cause just about the ugliest damage we see in floriculture (Fig. 1), and they have incredible pesticide-resistance capabilities. Outbreaks seem to go in cycles, and I’ve had quite a few gerbera and mum crops come across my desk with leafminer this past 2 weeks.

This post covers chemical options (BawHawHawHa!!! Oh… Sorry… I’ll get myself under control now) and non-chemical options for leafminer, as well as how their control fits into the big picture in greenhouse IPM programs.  

Continue reading “Leafminer control in Ontario’s greenhouse crops -what’s working?”

“Sticking” it to high populations of thrips in greenhouse crops.

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Can patterned tapes significantly improve thrips catches?

You’ve likely noticed by now that thrips populations are especially high because of the hot, dry summer. Many growers are noticing their usual biocontrol programs can’t keep up, and further defenses are needed this year.

The use of mass trapping strategies may be the key to getting an edge over thrips. This post discusses the latest research on mass trapping of thrips in ornamentals, including patterned sticky tapes and the use of pheromones.  

Continue reading ““Sticking” it to high populations of thrips in greenhouse crops.”